Adventures in TAA

I wrote my first tactical asset allocation system over a year ago (see the alpha version here). Not because I was enthralled with the power of the approach, but because I was concerned that my discretionary trading results would suffer a serious decline following my demise. For the sake of the family finances I wanted something that could function well without me.

Though it shouldn’t be, it’s still a work in progress. It shouldn’t be because even something as simple as the Permanent Portfolio has worked pretty well over several decades, and may perform relatively better as time defeats each wave of “smarter” approaches.

As logical as that is, I can’t do it. I feel stupid using something that simple and have to “improve’ it. So the challenge is to create something that will make me feel smart enough to be comfortable and stick with it, while preventing the additional complexity from having any real impact on the results. Ideally the embellishments should be like the Emperor’s new clothes: Good enough to fool the user, but in reality non-existent.

I had to wait a year for a little turmoil in the bond market, but after some modification I think I have a good candidate. It still needs another year in the sandbox and some tedious QA on the code, but here’s what I’ve learned so far:

  1. For a set it and forget it long-term system, momentum has been, and is likely to remain, the best method for selecting positions. Human psychology has been remarkably stable over centuries, and most people are sheep, so trends are likely to exist as long as humans remain in their current form. Mean reversion will always be around too – but it may stubbornly refuse to revert in your financial lifetime (which leverage in any form will considerably shorten).
  2. The number of simultaneous positions you should hold ends up a function of risk tolerance. Holding one position at a time in a fund switching system generally yields the best absolute returns, but the volatility which creates those returns cuts both ways. It looks great on paper when you know how it all turns out, but when you’re down 35% and staring into the great unknown it feels entirely different. For me, limiting the maximum number of positions to 2 or 3 funds seems the best balance between risk and reward.
  3. However it’s measured, momentum is a trend following approach and is therefore prone to whipsaws, especially in sideways markets. Including 20 highly correlated stock ETFs in your system is going to multiply whipsaws by at least 20-fold as it jumps from one to another, while adding far less than 20-fold improvement in returns.  Pick one fund in each asset class (preferably the one with the lowest cost and highest daily volume) and leave it at that. If you can’t hold the line there, then split your money and trade separate portfolios to limit the number of trades between correlated assets. One pot for international, one for domestic, or whatever floats your boat. Putting it all into one bucket will chop you into ribbons.
  4. Cash is an asset class which should be in any TAA system. It’s been almost 40 years since cash was truly king for any length of time, so it’s easy to dismiss the value, but that also means the next coronation is that much closer.
  5. Forget benchmarking. Beating some index means nothing to you as an individual. Your personal goals alone should determine success or failure. Technically, if you are beating inflation by even a little over time, you’re ahead of the game – and over sufficiently long periods I’m not sure much more is possible. If that’s not enough for you, reevaluate your spending and goals. Money is only a means to an end. Figure out what ends you’re really seeking with your money chase. Here is a good one (via Abnormal Returns).
  6. Test your system over as much data as you can and with the worst cases you can devise. Don’t assume the 20th century was a representative sample. In the last part of the 19th century deflation was frequent, incomes and GDP rose at the fastest rate in US history, and the stock market went pretty much nowhere for long periods. If the world has to make sense to you for your system to work well, it’s doomed.
  7. Simple = robust. It’s the fifth law of thermodynamics or something.
  8. Devising a system that’s truly agnostic about the future is extremely difficult. Biases resulting from early experiences can shape a lifetime of investing. So many assumptions are buried in how you view the world and markets, it’s hard to discover and unravel them all. Read every market history you can find to gain a better understanding of the possibilities.

Though successful investing can be described very simply, implementation soon reveals an abyss of chaos and confusion lurking behind those simple ideas. In moments of despair, remember that living below your means will solve the majority of your financial problems given time, regardless what happens in the markets. Your most important task as an investor is to avoid making that too difficult.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Adventures in TAA

  1. Pingback: Hottest Links: Hordes Of Chaos, GSElevator, And SEC Stock Pickers | KculShare™

  2. Pingback: Wednesday links: an abyss of chaos | Abnormal Returns

Please leave a relevant comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s